You’re nobody until you’ve been the victim of “swatting,” and now American Idol host extraordinaire Ryan Seacrest can add his name to the list of who’s who.

 

Swatting, as defined by Wikipedia, is “an attempt to trick any emergency service (such as a 9-1-1 dispatcher) into dispatching any emergency response based on a false reporting of an incident. Incidents may range from large to small, from an entire SWAT unit to a fabricated police report meant to discredit an individual as a prank or personal vendetta.”

 

The incident occurred yesterday afternoon, and the police were dispatched to Ryan’s home in Beverly Hills. In fact, the 90210 “fuzz” tweeted about it, saying “BHPD Responded to Entertainer Ryan Seacrest's Residence Due to A Swatting Call. No Signs Of Trouble, Everyone OK.  Press Release To Follow.”

 

Anyone else think it’s weird that the Beverly Hills police have a Twitter account? No? Just us?

 

The Ryan Seacrest swatting prank came only hours after the radio host spoke to Russell Brand, whose home in the Hollywood Hills was hit Monday. Of course, the comedian took the opportunity to crack a joke about his own swatting incident.

 

“'Swatting,' I don’t like the word very much. Swatting, obviously what you do to insects or a passing bottom,” Russell joked to Ryan on his morning radio show, “On Air With Ryan Seacrest”. “If all swatting attacks are this unnoticeable, I’m ready for war because I didn’t even know it had happened. I still don’t know what a swatting attack is.”

 

The swatting call for Ryan is just the latest in a string of of celebu-swats (yeah, we coined that). Before him were Justin Timberlake, Rihanna, Selena Gomez, Sean Combs, and more. Ryan is definitely in the “in crowd.”

 

We shouldn’t joke, however, as the LAPD has expressed frustration and concern over the swatting calls, as they can be made by text, call, or computer-generated report. What impedes the investigation is the fact that these people can disguise their contact information by using multiple computer servers.

 

We’ve come a long way since Matthew Broderick in War Games.

 

Source: LA Times