Credit: Time Photo: Beyoncé's Time 100 Influential Cover

Who knew a feminist scholar and Bill O'Reilly would have so much in common?

Beyoncé was recently on the cover of Time magazine, honoring the 100 most influential people. In response, Fox News's O'Reilly bashed Queen Bey as a bad role model for young women, referencing her sexy videos and the high pregnancy rate of unwed African-American women.

It’s one thing to hear that from Bill O’Reilly — who really expects anything else from him? — but feminist bell hooks, aka Gloria Jean Watkins, also took her turn dissing Bey.

Beyoncé has called herself a "modern-day feminist," but during a recent panel discussion about "liberating the black female body," author and social activist bell challenged Bey as a good example for women. "I see a part of Beyonce that is, in fact, anti-feminist -- that is a terrorist, especially in terms of the impact on young girls," she said (via Us Weekly). "I actually feel like the major assault on feminism in our society has come from visual media and from television and videos."

She later asked if people would be interested in Beyoncé at all if she weren't so rich. "Because I don't think you can separate her class, power, and the wealth from people's fascination with her, that here is a young black woman who is so incredibly wealthy,” bell continued. “Wealthy is what so many young people fantasize, dream about, sexualize, eroticize...and one could argue even more than her body is what that body stands for...wealth, fame, celebrity -- all the things that so many people in our culture are lusting for, wanting."

Would people be so “enchanted” if Beyoncé looked the same way but was a poor, struggling woman instead of an A-list celeb, bell asked? "Or is it the combination of all of those things that are at the heart of imperialist, white supremacist, capitalist patriarchy?"

Read more of the panel discussion here. It’s an interesting debate. "Terrorist" is a loaded word to use about anyone, and it seems a bit strong for Beyoncé. But since she is so visible and influential, it’s no surprise that she’s become a symbol instead of just herself. Some people — of both genders and every color — are inspired by her, but others clearly see her influence as troubling. Where do you stand?

Source: Us Weekly