When we found out Season 6, Episode 17 was going to revolve around a bunch of feet that wash up on the Canadian border, we immediately thought, “Great! Friendly people, cute accents, and maybe an “eh” or two thrown in for good measure.” But then we remembered, this is Bones we’re talking about.

Instead, we got exploding bodies, dismembered body parts, and rotting corpses. Not even our sweet neighbors to the north could save “The Feet on the Beach” from being the stomach-churner that it was. Read on for the three grossest moments from last Thursday’s episode.

3. Off on the wrong foot
Smelling someone else’s shoes doesn’t appeal to us — and smelling shoes that come off a corpse is downright nasty. But if you’re Hodgins (TJ Thyne), it’s all in a day’s work. Not only does he get all up in that stinky boot, he makes his poor pregnant wife, Angela (Michaela Conlin), take a whiff, asking, “Is it just me or do these smell like a bad gym?” To make matters worse, he shares this scrumptious tidbit of info: “The human foot sweats an average of one cup a day.” File this as Fact #202 in the list of things we really didn’t need to know.

2. Lost and found
You think your feet look unattractively wrinkly after a long bath? Try imagining what they would look like if they’d been floating in a river for eight days. Thanks to Bones, we don’t have to. When a member of a Canadian border patrol trips over a pair of feet that aren’t his own, the show does not leave the visual to our imagination. Instead they zoom in on the severed feet that literally fell off their body after floating in the river for too long.

1. A serious tummy ache
Forgive us (again) if we expected the “body farm” that Brennan (Emily Deschanel) and Booth (David Boreanaz) investigate to be of the cuddly animals variety, not a research center full of decaying bodies. Our bad. And the bodies themselves are really bad: a hanging corpse falling to the ground, leaving its head in a noose; a skeleton floating in a hot tub; and a bloating body literally exploding, oozing out its intestines. Brennan puts it best: “You rarely get to actually see a body rupture form distension.” We think we could have lived without that image, thank you very much.