Credit: Munawar Hosain/Startraks Photo: Nathan Fillion Poses at a Castle Press Conference on April 9, 2010
After a crisis of conscience in the season finale, Beckett does a 180 and tells Demming she can't go to his beach house because she isn't "ready for something like this." Of course, what she really means is that she's decided to take Castle up on his offer to spend some time at his beach house — an invitation she already turned down. *Sigh*. Of course, just as she's poised to admit all this to Castle during his farewell party, his ex-wife shows up at the station. Castle's found someone else to keep him company in the Hamptons! Castle leaves, Beckett feels dumb, and we wonder: Will Demming be back? Does Beckett find another guy? Will she drunkenly text Castle late at night over the summer? (Maybe, maybe, and definitely.)

Meanwhile, cases involving vampires, a cursed mummy, balsamic vinegar poisoning, and a man posing as an Arctic explorer are all solved.

Other than that, Alexis heads to Princeton for the summer, Martha finally lands a role, a serial killer blows up Beckett's apartment, and Rider Strong makes a guest appearance. All in all, it's a very busy 24 episodes.
Credit: Video courtesy of ABC Photo: Castle Season 3 Starter Kit
Season 2 of Castle is kind of like the friend you have who understands complicated ideas but can't grasp simple concepts. When Beckett and Castle finally find the hit man who killed Beckett's mother — a mystery that somehow went unsolved for years — Beckett is forced to shoot him before discovering who gave the order. After that, everyone sort of gives up on the case altogether.

Meanwhile, cases involving an amnesiac asthmatic, South African snakes, and an undercover dominatrix hanging from a jungle gym (and covered in caramel) are all solved.

Then there's the love triangle between Beckett, Castle, and Demming. During a multi-episode arc, Detective Demming (Michael Trucco) of the NYPD's Robbery Division is brought in to assist the Homicide Division. There is an immediate attraction between Demming and Beckett, sending Castle into a bit of a tailspin. Not only does this guy interrupt a situation fraught with sexual tension, he also has the nerve to be a real police officer. Among Demming's other great qualities: He's absolutely gorgeous; he helps underprivileged children; he's straightforward about his interest in Beckett; and he's not writing a series of books threatening to delegitimize Beckett's law enforcement career. BUT all of this is ultimately superseded by the fact that Beckett finds Castle unreliable and obnoxious. What are you gonna do, right?