Credit: photo via Daemons TV Photo: Castle, Kevin and Beckett Crack the Case in Episode 3.2
For this edition of Power Rankings, we’ve decided to include a quote or song lyric beneath each character’s name that best exemplifies their standings this week. Read below to find out who had the power in Episode 3.2!

Castle: Top Cop Writer
“In this country, you gotta make the money first. Then when you get the money, you get the power. Then when you get the power, then you get the women.”
– Tony Montana, Scarface

As soon as Beckett revealed to Castle that the psychic’s dream was about someone named Alexander, the balance of power back shifted back in Castle’s direction, because his real middle name is (obviously) Alexander. (Why he bothered changing it to Edgar for Edgar Allen Poe is beyond us. Just buy the collected works, jeez.) Once again, the writer’s advantage became clear. He’s rich and famous, so he gets to work for the NYPD. He solves most of the cases, so he gets the glory. The glory makes him dreamy, so he’s probably going to get Beckett.

Beckett: Starry-eyed Lover
“We're heading for something / Somewhere I've never been / Sometimes I am frightened / But I'm ready to learn / Of the power of love”
– Jennifer Rush, “The Power of Love”

If Castle had eyes in the back of his head, he would probably be nervous to discover just how often Beckett watches him walk away at the end of their conversations. Beckett’s edge in this episode is supposed to be that she is the realist, the one who doesn’t believe in ghosts, fairies, or Sylvia Brown. The trouble is we all know (herself included), that she is only playing a realist on TV. When Castle told her his real middle name at the end of the show, she looked like a woman who’s been reading her horoscope every day for years. She’s now in second place.

Esposito: The Middle Child
“Well, all I hear all day long at school is how great Marcia is at this or how wonderful Marcia did that! Marcia, Marcia, Marcia!”
– Jan Brady, The Brady Bunch

If there’s anyone with the potential to start yelling one day, it’s Esposito. After initially failing to convince the team that the psychic was more than a top-notch research analyst, Castle says he’s surrounded by skeptics. Esposito says, “Call me a cop, bro.” While this line wasn’t meant to be aggressive, it certainly could read that way, because Castle is the only one there who, um, can’t be called a cop. Esposito is curt with Ryan when his partner looks open to the possibility that the victim predicted her own murder, because, hey, someone has to remain level-headed about this touchy-feeley junk. Then, when Esposito starts to wonder if it might be legit, Beckett rejects the idea. Naturally, it ends up looking like Castle was right about the predictions all along, and since Esposito isn’t in love with him like Beckett is, we imagine within him there’s a mix of admiration and frustration brewing. That combination can be dangerous.

Ryan: Low Man on the Totem Pole
“Fredo? Well, he's got a good heart, but he's weak.”
– Michael Corleone, The Godfather II

Something big needs to happen for Ryan this season so he can end this glorified internship with the NYPD. He does so much work without the reward of a major storyline.  We’ve decided it can only be one of two things — a wedding or a hostage situation. If he gets married, the team could hear about something brave he did during a relative’s teary toast. Of course, someone would also have to be found bludgeoned in the church pew or floating in the reception hall fountain in order to move the episode along. Alternatively, Ryan could be held for ransom, whereby the team would realize what he means to them while also giving the detective an opportunity to MacGyver his way out. There was a semi-awkward scene in this episode where Beckett rattled off instructions to a very bewildered looking Ryan. We suspect that he’s just slightly intimidated by his colleagues, which is preventing him from maximizing his full potential.  As Fredo famously said, “I’m smart! I’m smart!”