Credit: Larry Busacca/Getty Images Photo: Woody Allen and Soon-Yi Previn

UPDATE: Dylan Farrow has already responded to her father's New York Times post, issuing a statement to various outlets that "nothing he says or writes can change the truth. [...] His op-ed is the latest rehash of the same legalese, distortions, and outright lies he has leveled at me for the past 20 years." Read her full statement here.

Original story:

Woody Allen just defended himself against allegations of sexual assault, using the same venue — the New York Times — that his daughter Dylan Farrow used to renew her accusations.

Dylan posted her open letter on February 1, discussing what she believes happened when she was 7 years old. At the time, Woody’s reps said the director had read the article and "found it untrue and disgraceful," saying he would be responding soon.

His response was posted on February 7. It begins, "Twenty-one years ago, when I first heard Mia Farrow had accused me of child molestation, I found the idea so ludicrous I didn’t give it a second thought. We were involved in a terribly acrimonious breakup, with great enmity between us and a custody battle slowly gathering energy. The self-serving transparency of her malevolence seemed so obvious I didn’t even hire a lawyer to defend myself."

He said he naively thought the accusation would be "dismissed out of hand because of course, I hadn't molested Dylan and any rational person would see the ploy for what it was."

The letter goes into great detail, and even touches on the idea that his son Ronan may be, as Mia has suggested, Frank Sinatra's son. Woody uses this to add weight to his argument that she may not be a person of "integrity" and "honesty."

Woody concludes with the hope that he and Dylan can reconnect, which he says is also the hope of his now wife Soon-Yi:

"Of course, I did not molest Dylan. I loved her and hope one day she will grasp how she has been cheated out of having a loving father and exploited by a mother more interested in her own festering anger than her daughter’s well-being. Being taught to hate your father and made to believe he molested you has already taken a psychological toll on this lovely young woman, and Soon-Yi and I are both hoping that one day she will understand who has really made her a victim and reconnect with us, as Moses has, in a loving, productive way. No one wants to discourage abuse victims from speaking out, but one must bear in mind that sometimes there are people who are falsely accused and that is also a terribly destructive thing."

Read his entire essay here. He said this piece would be his final word on the matter, with no further comments coming. "Enough people have been hurt." Of course, that doesn't mean Mia, Dylan or other members of the family won't respond to his defense, since they probably will.

How do you feel about this family saga? It's impossible for any of us to know the truth from the outside, but it's an even more difficult situation when the people who were actually there can't agree on the truth either.

Source: New York Times