Despite its inarguable dominance in any Emmys field that features the words "Actor" and "Drama," Breaking Bad has yet to take home the coveted Outstanding Drama Series award. Last year, that honor went to Homeland's thrilling freshman season, and before that it was all Mad Men, all the time for four straight years. It's time for that to change.

This year's nominees are all strong — arguably, the only weak winner would be Downton Abbey. (Sorry Downton. Still love ya, still addicted to ya, but Season 3 just was not up to snuff.) However, while the rest of the nominees were gripping, only Breaking Bad spent last season crafting the first half of a lean, mean, fantastic final season.

Of course, none of the other nominees were in their final seasons, so it's not exactly a fair comparison. But hey, they can get their due when the time comes if they manage to pull off a rush to the end nearly as thematically resonate, tightly plotted, and beautifully acted as Breaking Bad Season 5. Which, let's be honest, very few shows do. And that's exactly the point.

The reason Breaking Bad deserves to finally get that Outstanding Drama award is because Season 5, part one, truly was outstanding, not just in the current TV landscape, but in comparison to many dramas that have come before. So many shows stumble and fall as they approach the end, but Breaking Bad only picked up the pace.

The first half of Season 5 was the clear culmination of everything that came before — showrunner Vince Gilligan's vision remained clear, precise, and riveting. Everything from the writing to the acting to the cinematography came together to create a tense portrayal of what happens when your protagonist breaks not just bad, but evil. It was something we hadn't seen before, and it was a punch to the gut in the best way.

On TV, it's all too rare for a show to come together so beautifully as it approaches its final chapter, so now would be the perfect time for the academy to start recognizing what Breaking Bad has achieved, not just on the individual acting level, but as a whole.

What do you think: Should Breaking Bad win the Emmy, or do you want it to go to another show? Sound off in the comments below!

Rebecca Martin is an Associate Editor at Wetpaint Entertainment and our resident Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad, and genre TV expert. Follow her on Twitter and Google+!


Credit: Celebified Photo: Amc To Split Mad Men's Seventh And Final Season Into Two Separate Parts; Series To Conclude In 2015