After a rather lackluster Episode 2, Game of Thrones kicked things up a notch with Season 4, Episode 4 ("Oathkeeper"), an episode that introduced a lot of interesting plot elements — including some big twists for fans of the book series.

Need help keeping track of everything that went down? Then read on for Wetpaint Entertainment's recap of the episode.

Meereen: A Revolution and a Dramatic Gesture

We open with Missandei (Nathalie Emmanuel) teaching Grey Worm (Jacob Anderson) the common tongue. It's pretty adorable. We can totally get on board with this budding possible romance. She shares memories of her home, and Grey Worm shares his one dream: Kill the masters.

Luckily for him, he gets to help just that happen when he leads an expedition into the city, where the Meereen slaves are already debating if they should try to overthrow their masters. Grey Worm gives the slaves a stirring speech and, more importantly, a whole lot of weapons. And with that, the revolution is sparked.

City taken, Daenerys (Emilia Clarke) takes something else: revenge, nailing 163 masters to crosses for the 163 slave children that were killed to threaten her while she made her way to Meereen. Barristan (Ian McElhinney) thinks this is maybe not the best idea ever, but Dany cares more about justice than mercy. Yeah, 'cause eye for an eye always works out well.

King's Landing: Lannister Family Tensions

In King's Landing, Bronn (Jerome Flynn) and Jaime (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) are still practicing their sparring. It's all lighthearted fun, until Tyrion (Peter Dinklage) comes up. Then things turn serious, with Bronn suggesting that Jaime should fight for Tyrion in a trial by combat. Or, you know, at least go visit him.

That might have been forward of him, but it does get Jaime to make the trek down to the dungeons. It's pretty delightful for a scene set in a prison. There are a lot of oddly sweet moments; clearly, these brothers truly do love each other. Jaime wants to help Tyrion, but he can't just sneak him out of the city. So, can he really do anything?

Not only is Cersei (Lena Headey) out for her brother, but she also wants Sansa (Sophie Turner) dead, which leads to a tense scene with her twin, where he confesses that he swore to protect the Stark girls. She asks if he'd be willing to kill Sansa, and his silence in responce says everything. Then they switch to Tyrion, which doesn't help matters. Jaime is convinced that his bro is innocent, but Cersei isn't having it. As far as she's concerned, Tyrion would be willing to kill them all. She ends the scene with a cold goodbye: "That will be all, Lord Commander."

So, what is Jaime going to do about that vow he made to Cat? Why, send Brienne out to go protect Sansa! He gives her the sword his father gave him at the beginning of the season. It was made out of Ned's sword, now it will protect Ned's daughter. Very symbolic. Brienne names the sword "Oathkeeper," for obvious reasons. He also gives her a sweet suit of armor, and a squire: Pod! Aww, Pod. Glad he's getting out of King's Landing alive.

Meanwhile, Team Tyrell makes their next move. Olenna (Diana Rigg) tells Margaery (Natalie Dormer) about how she seduced her hubby because she wanted to marry him, not her intended. Oh, Olenna. You're the best. She goes on to basically confess to having had a hand in Joffrey's murder, because he was The Worst and she didn't want her granddaughter to be married to him. She tells Marg to lock her next hubby, Tommen, down. We're pretty sure Marg shouldn't do that with sexual seduction, though, since Tommen is still a kid.

And good news! She doesn't. Instead, she manages to bond with her hubby-to-be over Tommen's cat, and their mutual hatred of Joffrey. Good job, Marg.

On the Sea: A Confession

On their boat, Sansa accuses Littlefinger (Aidan Gillen) of orchestrating Joffrey's murder. He nonchalantly confesses, telling Sansa that her necklace had a part in it; the gem was poison. Littlefinger monologues that he's willing to risk anything to get what he wants; Joffrey was unpredictable, and now he has new, more reliable friends. By which he means the Tyrells. Olenna wanted Joff dead, and what better way to make sure his new friends love him than murder?

The Wall: Jon, the Leader

At the Wall, Jon (Kit Harington) is busy helping train people until Alliser Thorne shuts him down. Polliver points out to Alliser that Jon is pretty popular, and at some point the Night's Watch is going to elect a new Lord Commander, so maybe Alliser would actually benefit if Jon were to have an unfortunate run-in with the mutineers at Craster's Keep.

Meanwhile, Jon meets a new Night's Watch recruit: Locke, who, if you recall, was actually sent there by Roose Bolton to track down Bran Stark (Isaac Hempstead Wright).

And it looks like we're going to see a whole lot more of Locke, because Alliser tells Jon that he is in charge of leading a group beyond the Wall, to go capture or kill the mutineers. But first, he has to recruit volunteers. He makes a nice little speech about safety and avenging Lord Commander Mormont, and actually manages to rally a decent number of people to the cause — including Locke. Hmm. That's no good. But otherwise, way to go Jon!

Beyond the Wall: Major Twists for Everyone

In case you'd forgotten: the mutineers are very bad people, as we are reminded in a delightful scene where they rape people and their leader, Karl (played by genre staple Burn Gorman), literally drinks out of Mormont's skull. To cap the scene off, Craster's last son is born, and all his daughter-wives chant creepily about how they have to give it to the White Walkers. The poor baby is left outside for the Walkers to do with what they will. But more on that later.

In a very convenient coincidence, it turns out Bran and crew are actually camped out near enough by to hear the baby. Bran wargs into Summer to see what's going on — and Summer gets trapped! In case you didn't realize (honestly, we'd forgotten), these guys have Ghost, who Bran also spots.

Bran and co. go to try to rescue Summer. They realize these mutineers are bad news, but before they can get away they're captured. Karl continues to be a sadistic bastard, threatening lives until Bran admits who he is to save his friends. This is entirely new material, not in the books, but it works. This development, combined with Locke's quest to find Bran, has us very worried and curious to see what happens next.

Way, Way Beyond the Wall

Baby cam! The White Walker takes Craster's baby to some clearly ceremonial location, where another Walker comes forward and... Turns it into a Walker. Whelp, that's a pretty big bit of mythology for the show to introduce on its own. Amazing graphics, though.

Random Thoughts:

  • Bronn and Jaime: "Do you talk to my brother this way?" "All the time. He got used to it."
     
  • Jaime on if Cersei wants Tyrion killed: "Now that you mention it, she did ask." Love how honest he is with Tyrion, and how affronted he was at the idea that he would actually kill his brother.
     
  • Tyrion on if he killed Joffrey: "The Kingslayer brothers. You like it? I like it."


What did you think of this episode? Let us know in the comments below!