Credit: Jeff Vespa/Getty Images Photo: Chris Colfer, Ashley Fink, and Amber Riley in the 2011 Golden Globes Portrait Studio

It was a bit surprising that Rosie O’Donnell attacked Glee star Ashley Fink (Lauren) for her recent performance on the hit show, but don’t think Ashley is crying into her cereal.

“It’s so crazy,” she told The Advocate. “Rosie’s been talking about me for a bit now, and it was very positive. Then she was on Access Hollywood, promoting a new hairstyle or something, and for some reason she decided to talk about me again. I’ve been a fan of Rosie’s for a long time — for Christmas one year I asked for a Koosh ball like she threw at people because I thought she was the coolest lady ever — so I am surprised at the comments she made. I’ve got swagger too, so I don’t find my storyline unrealistic. When I went to performing arts high school, I did date the cutest boy in school, and I sang whatever song I wanted. My storyline has resonated with a lot of people, plus-sized and not, who don’t feel ‘other,’ so I’m honored to portray Lauren.”

Ashley’s fan base is decidedly on her side as well, something which probably softens the Rosie blows. “What a way to wake up on a Friday, right? My followers were like, ‘What?! Ashley’s beautiful!’ I was like, OK, something must’ve happened while I was asleep.”

So, is Ashley upset with Rosie? “Not really, but I’ll possibly address it with her in the future. If I see her, I might be like, ‘Woman, let’s talk about this. Don’t be jealous ’cause a big girl’s doing her thing on Glee.’ [Laughs] I love Rosie and I respect her opinion, so all I can say is that some of her comments were strange to me. But she was supportive originally, and I think she’s still supportive: She did say that she knows Brad Falchuk and Ryan Murphy are good navigators of this ship, and I agree. Besides, I don’t write the show, so I don’t have control over her complaints. But I’m really happy with my character, I’m proud to play her, and I’m having a blast. The whole plus-sized thing is so relevant in the media, but it’s so much less of a big deal in real life.”

Source: The Advocate