Has Kurt (Chris Colfer) lost his edge? One TV critic seems to think so.

Glee creator Ryan Murphy has had any number of magazine profiles written about him, and now you can add one more to the list, as The New Yorker’s Emily Nussbaum weighs in on the show.

Emily cites Kurt as a Ryan Murphy surrogate and lauds the show for initially showing Kurt’s “blend of self-pity and self-assertion, with wounds made into weapons.” She appreciates that Kurt “in early episodes he was a moral mixture, at once bully and victim.”

However, Emily now feels that the show has softened Kurt. “As Glee caught on, Kurt became a bit saintly,” she writes.

We’re not so sure that we agree. If you ask us, Kurt still has no problem putting people in their place, and this can sometimes reflect his own insecurities. This is particularly true with his bestie Rachel, as in Kurt’s comment last week about how Rachel and Brody were using the turkey as a “courtship device.” Yep, Kurt’s still got it!

Emily feels that she never knows if Glee will deliver a stellar episode or a “clunker.” For example, she points out that last season’s domestic violence storyline involving Beiste was “truly offensive.”

She thinks that this season has continued to be “uneven,” saying that she enjoys the NYC scenes but finds the McKinley newbies to be “bland.” However, she really loved Season 4, Episode 4: “The Break-Up,” calling it the season’s best episode. 

We agree that “The Break-Up” was powerful, but we feel that this season has been as delightful and moving as any of the previous ones have been. Improbable as it might be, Glee keeps getting better!

Source: The New Yorker

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