Credit: Sierra Prescott

Glee’s Chris Colfer’s (Kurt) is about to make his big screen debut. Struck By Lightning, the movie he both wrote and starred in, hits movie theaters this January. Bridesmaids’ Rebel Wilson and Modern Family’s Sarah Hyland both appear as Chris’s classmates in the film, and there are plenty of other quirky characters at the high school, as well.

Wetpaint Entertainment spoke exclusively with Roberto Aguire, the actor who plays SBL’s resident foreign exchange student/ladies man, Emilio. The Hollywood up-and-comer gave us the inside scoop on his work with the film both on- and off-camera and revealed just how long it really took to perfect Emilio’s flawless and dreamy hairstyle.

First of all, the fact that you got to work with Chris Colfer on Struck By Lightning is so cool.
You’re telling me, he’s amazing! Honestly, it’s like you stand next to him, and you’re like Oh, give me a little bit of that talent, please? Just a little tiny bit? He’s amazing.

Tell me a little bit about your character in the film. He sounds really funny.
I guess you can call him like the school womanizer. He’s the guy who gets all the girls in high school. Because he’s, foreign, I guess. He has that seductive kind of Spanish language that he uses and he’s — I think you could call him the Latin Lover. The size of his hair is also hugely important. It literally towers like three feet off his head, so I think that’s a pretty important feature.

How long did it take you to get your hair done every day?
Oh my god, it took an hour every day! I never knew what teasing hair was, and then every day I’d have to get in the [hair and makeup] trailer and they’d tease the hair up just three feet. It was amazing.

Normally you’d say, Okay, I’ll just spray it with something. It will stand up. No, every single strand had to be teased upwards. I have a newfound respect for what women go through.

But if the ladies loved it....
Yeah. I can’t complain, right?

In addition to acting in Struck By Lightning, you were also a producer for the film. What did that look like?
It was a crazy process for me. It’s the first movie I’ve ever produced. I don’t think you ever really know what a producer does until you do it, or until you can find someone who can really explain it to you. That’s usually not the case. People can’t really tell you what a producer does, because he does everything. I mean, you’re there from the very beginning of pre-production through all of the actual filming of the movie, through all the post-, and all the problems get resolved and every little part of the movie is your responsibility. But it’s really, really fulfilling, because you get to have a project that’s, in essence, all your own. Everything about it is a commitment that you’re making, and it’s really cool. I loved the experience and I’d love the opportunity to do it again.  

Tell us a little bit about your background. 
I grew up in Switzerland, in Geneva, and I found my passion for acting there. I did a play, when I was fifteen, called Brighton Beach Memoirs, and I caught the acting bug. From there, I did a couple summer camps at the New York Film Academy, and then I decided this is what I want to do with my life. I went to Tisch School of the Arts in New York to study acting, and Economics, actually, because my dad said If you want to be an actor, you have to make sure you understand money. I said, Okay, I guess, and I graduated with a double major in Economics and Acting, and I came straight to L.A. after I graduated, in January of last year, so I’ve barely been here two years. 

Then, three months later, everything for Struck By Lightning kind of came together, and I was doing my first movie. It was so amazing and lucky and I couldn’t believe that I had just graduated, and I was now producing and acting in a movie.

For your first movie, that’s pretty impressive.
And not only any movie, a movie written by Chris, produced by Chris, and having Chris as the star. I couldn’t believe it.

What are your goals for the future. Do you want to get more into acting, more into producing?
For me, it’s definitely acting. I love acting. There’s nothing like being onstage or in front of a camera and being able to play someone else. I think that’s the coolest thing for us actors; we get to live so many different lives in the span of a year. Hopefully, we’ll be able to play five, six, ten different people — and even if you’re playing the same person, you’re living a different life. I mean, you’re living someone else’s life, and that is so much fun. So acting for me. I’d love to produce, as well, but it takes kind of a backseat to my acting.  

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