Credit: via PostSecret.com Photo: Kurt "It's Okay to Be Me" Poster

Okay, Gleeks, there has been a ton — and we mean a ton — of Glee backlash over the past few weeks, focused almost entirely around the enormous amount of screen time lavished on the bullied and nearly-orphaned Kurt. Kurt. TV Guide writes:

”This show used to be about an idealistic teacher trying to help a group of misfits find their voice through show choir. Now it's all about a kid who is bullied at a school where there are a few less-important misfits in a show choir that never seems to rehearse for the upcoming sectionals, and an annoying teacher with the worst boundaries on the planet.”

Ouch! Love him as we may, we have to admit: Recently, Glee has kind of been the Kurt show (and don't get us started on Mr Shue's creepy boundary issues!).

And let's take a moment and be honest, shall we? Even die-hard Gleeks have to admit that their beloved show has always been kind of a mess. The tone is wildly erratic (oscillating between biting satire and after-school special), the characters are consistently inconsistent, and over-arching story lines tend to miss the mark (we still have nightmares about last season's seemingly endless baby drama). But, like a slushied social misfit you can't help but love, Glee's scrappy messiness is also one of its most endearing qualities. The show may not always deliver they way creator Ryan Murphy intends it to; but at least it's honest, earnest, and, above all else, persistent.

Which brings us back to Kurt; or, more specifically, to his critics. To the haters who are suffering from Kurt exhaustion, we ask this: when is the last time that we've ever seen television (and the mainstream media) pay this much attention to the life and times of a troubled gay teen? The answer, of course is "never." There's something recklessly gutsy about using one of television's most wildly popular shows as a soapbox, highlighting the truly important problem of gay-teen bullying.

Look again at the picture up above. It was posted on Sunday on Post Secret, the online project where people anonymously submit personalized postcards. If one person took the time to write about the positive impact that Kurt has made on their life, then it stands to reason that there are hundreds — maybe even thousands — of kids in the same boat. So sure, there might be some naysayers who are antsy about not having enough Finnchel screen time — but for all the good the recent Kurt storyline has done... well, it's pretty damn worth it, if you ask us.