Credit: Adam Rose/FOX. ©2012 Fox Broadcasting Co

During the Glee Season 4 premiere, the world was introduced Robin, the tiny infant daughter of Jane Lynch‘s snarky cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester.

While nothing was mentioned in the episode, actress Jane Lynch earlier revealed that little Robin was born with Down syndrome — and ABC News reports that Jordyn Orr, the actress who plays baby Robin, also has Down syndrome.

Speaking exclusively to Wetpaint Entertainment, Diane Grover of the International Down Syndrome Coalition says she “loved” the way Glee has chosen to handle baby Robin’s storyline.

“It was so nice to see that everyone treated Robin just like they would any other baby,” says Diane, the executive director of the IDSC. “Our children are children first, and they did a great job of showing that by not over-emphasizing her diagnosis. I greatly appreciated that. There is a lot to be said about what was not said! Funny as that sounds.”  

Robin wasn’t introduced as a baby with Down syndrome, she was simply a baby. Nothing more needed to be added.

Credit: Michael Yarish/FOX ©2011 Fox Broadcasting Co.

“Too often too much is made of a diagnosis, which creates misgivings and fear in people. Sue has been around individuals who have Down syndrome before, her sister, and Becky, so she knows there is nothing to fear. That is exactly what that scene said to the audience,” Diane adds.

However, no effort was made to hide who Robin is, either. “I especially loved how they focused in on her sweet little face, with her beautiful features that are so widely recognized for those who have Down syndrome,” Diane gushes. “Their close up created no doubt for the audience that Sue's "love of her life" has Down syndrome." 

During the episode, Sue tells Kurt (Chris Colfer) that she chose Robin’s name, in part, because it reminds her of hope and springtime. “Babies do bring new parents hope. A child that has Down syndrome is no different,” Diane says.

“I loved the way they handled the whole thing. Robin's diagnosis of Down syndrome is not a tragedy, but instead, a source of hope for Sue. [It’s an] Absolutely beautiful way to introduce their newest little character.”

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