In the past couple months, Lindsay Lohan has gone through some big life changes: She got out of rehab, hired a sobriety coach, dealt with her mom’s DWI, started dating someone, broke up with him, and now seems to be putting a focus on showing off her glowing face around town. But though she seems to be trying to move on with her life, putting the past behind her (Thanks, Oprah!), someone just won’t let her.

Paul Schrader, who directed LiLo in The Canyons alongside James Deen (the porn star, duh), has been all over the papers talking smack about his star. And he’s not done yet. On September 25, Paul took it to Facebook to lay the smackdown on Lindz, calling out her failure to promote the film despite being a quarter-owner, and pointing out that he tried to fire her, no one wanted to hire her, and she’s got nothing she’s working on.

“I am mystified and disappointed by LL's refusal to support The Canyons,” he writes. “She is a producer of the film, a 25% owner. She has received wonderful reviews (among the negative) for her performance. I hired her when no one else would. She fought to keep the role when I wanted to fire her for unreliability. She has no other films in the can.”

Beyond her refusal to show up to the Venice Film Festival, shortly out of rehab, the director goes on to say that the New Yorker’s Richard Brody wanted to do an appreciative profile of the starlet “but somehow she didn’t have time to meet him.”

He follows that up with an interesting theory, saying “I can only surmise that Lindz had decided that Canyons is part of a reprobate past she must put behind her in order to move forward. She was never comfortable working with James Deen and perhaps this still sticks in her craw. I assume those [closest] to her, her family and reps, had advised her to treat Canyons as an indiscretion. But, for me, the reality is the opposite.”

Though he finishes off the lambaste with a compliment, saying that the “extraordinary piece of work” “serves her well” and that her “work is excellent,” he seems convinced that the role would have vaulted her from “ingenue” to “leading lady” if she had promoted the film, which received pretty terrible reviews, for the most part.

Do you agree with Lindsay’s director? Was this a fair way for him to address his disappointment?

Source: E! Online, Facebook


Julia Wayne is an Editor at Wetpaint Entertainment. Follow her on Twitter and Google+!