We’ve been lamenting the end of Mad Men for months now, already making lists of the things we’ll miss about the AMC show when it ends after Season 7. But today, the network that has given us Don Draper since 2007 announced that we won’t be saying goodbye to the ‘60s-set drama in 2014 after all. So, what’s going on?

The network has decided to split the final season into two parts, to be aired in Spring 2014 and Spring 2015. Also, rather than its normal 13-episode season, Season 7 will add one more, with the first seven airing next year, and the remaining seven airing the following.

“This approach has worked well for many programs across multiple networks, and, most recently for us with Breaking Bad, which attracted nearly double the number of viewers to its second half premiere than had watched any previous episode,” said Charlie Collier, AMC president. “We are determined to bring Mad Men a similar showcase. In an era where high-end content is savored and analyzed, and catch-up time is used well to drive back to live events, we believe this is the best way to release the now 14 episodes that remain of this iconic series.”

True, the deeper nuances of the show can get lost in the initial viewing, or in watching the episodes too close to one another. With the added space, it’s possible that fans can rewatch the episodes — or the entire series, for that matter — before finishing out the beloved show.

“We plan to take advantage of this chance to have a more elaborate story told in two parts, which can resonate a little bit longer in the minds of our audience,” said Matthew Weiner, creator and executive producer, Mad Men. “The writers, cast and other artists welcome this unique manner of ending this unique experience.”

It’s good to know the cast is onboard with the change, since many of them have been committed to the incredible series since the beginning — and it has made several of them into higher profile stars.

Another thing we’ve thought of with this new schedule? The Emmys, of course. Though Jon Hamm has been nominated for the prestigious award every year since the show started, he’s always been overshadowed by showier performances from Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad), Damian Lewis (Homeland), and Kyle Chandler (Friday Night Lights). Perhaps having a Breaking Bad-free Emmys in 2015 will give Jon more elbow room with voters.

What do you think about this development? Weigh in below with your thoughts.

Source: AMC


Julia Wayne is an Editor at Wetpaint Entertainment. Follow her on Twitter and Google+!