A soon as baby’s born, the first thing to do is cut the ties to Womb World and welcome them into their new life as an independent being. The umbilical cord gets cut, the placenta gets discarded — or made into pills, or whatever, if you’re into that sort of thing. In a new trend called “lotus birthing,” however, independence isn’t forced with a quick snip-snip. That’s right. Everything stays connected until it’s ready to part ways, naturally.

Trends are difficult to place on a timeline, considering the world is massive and that any “new trend” could have started hundreds of years ago and just became popular a week ago. We have a hard time believing that lotus birthing just popped out of nowhere.

Huffington Post recently threw a spotlight on the trend as they interviewed a couple who cut the cord on their first child and left it alone on their second… for a week… until it fell off.

Gag.

We wear our reactions on our sleeve here at Wetpaint Moms, and currently our sleeve is over our mouths.

Those who believe in lotus birthing view the baby’s connection to the placenta as vital, even after both have been born (the placenta is sometimes referred to as the “after birth,” after all). These lotus birthers do not touch the umbilical cord or the placenta, allowing the baby to feed from the nutrients and oxygen within the sac until both pieces shrivel and disconnect naturally.

Leta Elliot was turned on to lotus birthing by her husband, Steve Meyer, and tried the new trend with their second child. Their first baby’s cord was clamped just seconds after birth, at which time Lara says she made an “anguished noise” and that "before that, she had been really happy." Their second child "was born at home and was very floppy and chilled out with a faraway look in her eyes for the first seven days, until her cord fell off."

Is it just us or does a “very floppy and chilled out” child with “a faraway look in her eyes” sound both creepy and concerning? If my baby wasn’t screaming its newborn head off, I would call the doc right away!

However convinced these lotus lovers are of the health benefits behind leaving baby and placenta attached, a British obstetricians group’s statement regarding the trend warns against serious infections.

If you wanted to pick an environment that encourages bacteria to grow you probably could not do better than to leave the placenta attached after birth. Soon after the baby is born there is no longer any circulation in the placenta, so it’s dead tissue and full of blood, making it the perfect culture medium for bacteria ... If the placenta remains attached, that risk of infection is greater.

We know what our opinions are on this, but with two conflicting statements one from a woman who’s tried it and one from a credible medical group, how do you feel about this new trend? Sound off below!

Source: Huffington Post


Want more Wetpaint Moms?
Like us on our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter!


Emmalie Vance is an Editorial Intern at Wetpaint Entertainment. Follow her on Google+!