The New York Times recently reported on a new study that found a connection between homemakers’ dwindling time spent completing housework and their growing waistlines over the past 45 years, which is kind of a touchy subject for us females, and honestly quite difficult to digest.

The study found that in 1965, women not employed outside the home spent an average of 25.7 hours a week on housework (excluding childcare), and similar women in 2010 only spent an average of 13.3 hours! Additionally, modern women are burning an average of 360 calories fewer per day than women back in the day.

Gawker noticed that many ladies took to Twitter to voice their furious opinions of both the newspaper and the study — to exclaim both their disappointment and shock. Fortunately, neither of these institutions is to blame for insulting women, because neither of them actually did!

What those women had assumed of the study was that because it had found a connection between the two occurrences, it automatically made judgments of today’s woman, and that the authors (three of them women) must have secretly hoped to ignite a fire under our bottoms to get off the couch and vacuum something.

In reality, the study was not unlike any other in that it simply stated the facts as they were. The researchers just so happened to use all female participants and just so happened to be measuring the differences in their weight from 1965 to 2010 in relation to active housework.

That’s all.

By definition, scientific studies are difficult to understand for us common folk, but you can always count on them to supply information in a completely unbiased way, otherwise the study would never have gotten published in the first place!

Sources: New York Times, PLOS One, Gawker


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