Since the series premiere of Girls last week (April 15), we’ve tried to make sense of the show, the ensuing controversies, and our basic reaction. Was it too white? Were the girls too entitled? Is it a horrible, or inaccurate, depiction of Generation Y? Most importantly, it seemed, is it realistic?

In Episode 2: “Vagina Panic,” it didn’t get any whiter (though the OB/GYN was vaguely Indian), the girls seemed even more entitled, and we’re not sure the blind ignorance on display, however charming, was reflective of people who were pre-teens on 9/11. Is the show real or just ridiculous?

In lieu of a standard recap, we’re going to review the aspects of Girls Episode 2 that we found the most realistic vs. the most ridiculous.

The Real

Both sex scenes. If you hadn’t read (extensively) about how much sex there is on the show, the first five minutes made this clear. And, despite the bad boy/good boy juxtaposition being alarmingly broad-stroked — boys do come in shades of grey, which we hope this show eventually addresses — try suspending judgment when we say we thought both kinds of sex were realistic. The jackrabbit, and the way-too-gentle gentleman. We would like to point out that the asshole can suffer from the latter, and the gent from the former, but otherwise, sex well represented.

Fear of STDs and AIDS. We’ll address the shockingly naïve assessments of getting STDs and AIDS under the Ridiculous, but for now, we’ll say that most girls in their early 20s are scared to death of both. Whether it’s due to vastly improved, progressive health classes in grade school, or Rent, we can’t say.

The bar. We know the NoLita bar Jessa went to for her White Russian and quickie. It’s widely known as a good bar for drinking during the day, and the crowd (i.e. two hunched over guys who didn’t really feel like talking) looked right.

Shoshanna’s virginity. We’re not naming names, but “a little birdie told us” that these days, girls in their early 20s aren’t all having tons of sex. Some are even virgins. And sure, they’re bashful about it. We also found Marnie’s reaction, treating her confession that she once drove into a puppy as the equivalent of confessing you’re a virgin, realistic.

The Ridiculous

That job interview. No, we’re sorry. Maybe, just maybe, in the years before the recession, someone with only an internship on their resume could get away with talking to a potential boss that way. But even then, no one who really wants an editorial job would think they could. In 2012, jobs in publishing are insanely hard to come by, let alone get. Hannah should have dressed up, sat up straight, and not succumbed to the casualness of her interviewer. Also, he would never act that way. Someone in his position is doing the work of three people, and he doesn’t have time to act that way.

The Soho clinic. Okay, why were they screaming and running around like kindergartners in the middle of a women’s clinic? And why did we only see other white patients?

The ignorance about sex and condoms. We really could have done without Hannah’s soliloquy on how, you know, AIDS would make it easier to dump a guy, or get your parents off your back for telling you to take an HTML course. But in the waiting room, the girls can’t decide if AIDS is “not that hard to contract” or “really easy to contract also.” Also, no 20-something girl Googles things like “stuff that gets up under the sides of condoms” or “diseases that come from no condom for one second.” We were raised on computers and know how to use Google. Also, the internet.

What did you think? Was Girls realistic in its second episode, or did you find the ridiculous too distracting to enjoy the genuinely witty and charming dialogue? 

Molly Friedman is an editor at Wetpaint Entertainment. Follow her on Twitter @MollyFriedman.

Catch the next episode of Girls on Sunday, April 29 at 10:30 p.m. ET/PT on HBO.