Much of the backlash over HBO’s polarizing new show Girls and its creator, star, and writer Lena Dunham, has to do with distaste for the main characters’ perceived sense of entitlement. Also, age-equivalent critics found the show uncomfortably (and, they say, inaccurately) depictive of their generation as a whole.

Co-executive producer Judd Apatow recently explained at the Tribeca Film Festival, that the critics who didn’t find the show relatable enough, or took personal offense to a show about middle-class girls living in Brooklyn who are struggling to realize their dreams, probably just don’t get the joke.

“It’s supposed to be a comedy about women in New York who are really smart, but their lives are a mess. They know they should be doing great things, but they don't know what it is, and they have kind of a feeling of self-entitlement about it. That's the joke of the show … Most people get that, but I guess some people don’t.”

Taking a shot at explaining the negative reactions (amid the majority of positive reviews), Judd said, “There have only been a couple of people who took any issue with it, but anytime most people are positive, there are some people — just out of boredom — who will write the contrarian review because who wants to read only good reviews?"

As for the rightful charges that some critics (and fans) have made against the show for being too white-centric, Judd offers hope that Girls will expand its worldview in terms of race soon.

"The show will be on for a long time, so there's plenty of time to have every type of person on the show,” adding, “We want it to reflect an honest life in New York, and we'll do all sorts of stuff by the time the show is over.” This is in line with Lena’s comments that she hopes to introduce more people of color in the second season.

Catch the next episode of Girls on Sunday, April 22 at 10:30 p.m. ET/PT on HBO.

Source: Huffington Post

Molly Friedman is an editor at Wetpaint Entertainment. Follow her on Twitter @MollyFriedman.