Credit: Interview

If you were a girl growing up in the late '80s and early '90s, you probably wanted to be Winona Ryder. She dated the coolest guys (Johnny Depp!), starred in the coolest movies (Heathers! Beetlejuice! Edward Scissorhands! Reality Bites!) and looked like a little goth goddess.

Winona is now 41, and after some rough patches, she's now back in the spotlight, looking ageless on the new cover of Interview magazine.

In the story, she talks about losing some early roles because she was deemed unattractive.

"I was in the middle of auditioning, and I was mid-sentence when the casting director said, 'Listen, kid. You should not be an actress. You are not pretty enough. You should go back to wherever you came from and you should go to school. You don't have it.' She was very blunt -- I honestly think that she thought she was doing me a favor. ... I was around 15 or 16. But it's funny and this is a testament to my parents and how they raised me I wasn't crushed. They had always instilled in me that it was way cooler to be an individual and to be unique and that you don't want to blend in."

Nowaday, she empathizes with 2013's starlets, who are emerging in a completely different world. In the interview, she was asked, "So what do you think when you see some of these girls, like Kristen Stewart and Jennifer Lawrence, go through what they're going through today?"

Credit: New World Pictures – © 1988 Photo: Christian Slater and Winona Ryder in Heathers

Winona answered, "I have to say, I really wonder if I would become an actress if I was their age now. I've only seen part of Twilight, but I've seen their other work and they're both super-talented. I don't know how they do it, though, in just trying to maintain some degree of a personal life and privacy. I don't know how you feel, but when Jodie Foster gave that speech at the Golden Globes, I heard people who were like, ‘Why is she talking about privacy when she's on stage?’ But I have to say, I got what she was saying. Look, this is a story in Interview, so I do get how people complaining about privacy when they're actually doing very public things can come across as a bit hypocritical. But I do feel so lucky that I got to get in at least 15 years pre-whatever that show is called where they follow you around and then put it on the Internet. That stuff just didn't exist before. I also have yet to make sense of reality shows and the whole famous-to-be-famous thing where I don't really know what they do, but they're very famous — I know that's a whole other thing. But in terms of what happened to me or to other people who are friends of mine who have gone through difficult times where it's really publicized . . . You know, it's hard — and I do have feelings about it. So it's a combination of my heart goes out to them, but then at the same time I know that they don't know anything different."

Yeah, it’s kind of amazing that so many people are itching to be famous nowadays, when the spotlight is much more invasive than it was for any past generation. Anyway, can you believe anyone ever thought Winona wasn’t pretty enough for anything?

Source: Interview