Tennessee has some major explaining to do. Reports have surfaced alleging that La Vergne High School in Rutherford County is segregating their students at lunch based on — get this! — academic performance. Which means the smart kids are sitting with the smart kids, and the kids with less that stellar grades (below 80 percent) are off on their lonesome at an academic intervention class that specifically takes place at lunch time.  

The school maintains that they're simply trying to raise the grades of students with low GPAs, but some parents are upset that their children are being removed from their peers and being forced to eat separately. One parent even called the decision a "civil rights violation and segregation."

So, what does the school district have to say for itself? District spokesperson James Evans told The Huffington Post that the academic intervention class is held at lunch so as not to take away from class time. He also says that only half of the students' lunch is taking up in "learning lab" — about 25 minutes.

“One misconception is that students are losing their lunchtime or being made to eat in some separate location,” Evans said. “They’re still eating in the cafeteria for 25 minutes.”

It seems slightly unfair that students in lower academic standing don't have as much free time as their peers with higher GPAs, not to mention the fact that they're surely missing out on opportunities to socialize and make friends. Do you think this system is fair? Weigh in below!

Source: The Huffington Post