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There’s a brand-new trend emerging among Hollywood’s celebrity parents, and it’s not your traditional parenting philosophy.

As reported in Vanity Fair, several A-list celebs are touting a parenting style known by the acronym RIE, which is pronounced “wry.” It stands for Resources For Infant Educators. The philosophy, which began in 1946 by a Los Angeles mother and self-described parenting expert, Magda Gerber, is that children should be treated with the utmost respect and dignity.

With the RIE method, things like sippy cups, high chairs, and bouncy seats are frowned upon.These items are “disrespectful” toward children because they don’t allow them to explore their true nature. Parents practicing RIE treat their children like mini adults (no baby talk is allowed) and it’s expected that children will behave accordingly.

Parents are also expected to unplug and be completely present physically and emotionally for their children. No more checking your email while breastfeeding or texting your agent during tummy time. Also on the ‘no’ list? Things like baby carriers, pacifiers, and even toys, virtually anything that might make life a bit easier for a multi-tasking mom who doesn’t have, say, an army of assistants to handle her every need.

As for all the crying that will ensue when you take away your child’s comfort items? Never fear, according to the RIE philosophy, unrestrained crying is what a baby should be doing. Better get some earplugs, folks, or wait, is that not being present enough?

It must be working for somebody. Stars like Penelope Cruz, Tobey McGuire, and Helen Hunt are just a few of the well-known names who practice the method. Actress Jamie Lee Curtis told Vanity Fair, “RIE takes you back to basics. RIE makes us all better. Better parents. Better partners. Better people.”

While the proponents make a slightly compelling argument that the baby industry is really all about making kids quiet and perhaps denying their ‘true nature,’ we can only imagine that well-heeled celebrities have the means to employ some good help while they’re getting all that focused parenting done. And if their baby spills juice on the carpet, they can probably just buy another one. Wait, did that sound bitter?

What do you think of RIE, is it the weirdest parenting method ever, or actually some pretty solid stuff?

Source: Vanity Fair