It seems like every season on The Bachelor, there’s one girl who gets singled out as “the crazy one” or the “mean girl,” or whatever. On Season 17, it was Tierra LiCausi and her partner in crime, Mr. Eyebrow. On Season 16, it was Courtney Robertson, who showed everyone up by winning the whole thing. And on Season 15, it was Michelle Money, who said some pretty rad things, even though her fellow competitors may not have been stoked about what was coming out of her mouth.

Well, as much as we all like to call out that creative editing as suspect, it’s only the girls who experience the result of producer’s wrath who really understand what it feels like. And while some may live with that forever because Bachelor Pad was canceled and now we don’t get to fall in like with Tierra’s other eyebrow, Michelle has come to terms with it. Wetpaint Entertainment caught up with the beautiful single mom at the 2nd Annual Chris4Life Celebrity Auction Event in Los Angeles on April 5, 2013 to talk about what it means to be on the show, how her portrayal actually created friendships, and what a few years’ retrospect adds to the experience.

Wetpaint Entertainment: You just said you had never met Courtney before, right?
Michelle Money: No.

Wetpaint: But you're being auctioned off together, right?
Michelle: Yes.

Wetpaint: How odd is that?
Michelle: You know what? It's funny. Once you're on the show, even just a phone conversation with someone, it's like you feel like you know them. You've already met. I've seen her on TV. She's seen me on TV, and then you talk and you have a real conversation. It's like, oh, yeah, we're homegirls. Like we know each other.

Wetpaint: What is it about the experience that really bonds people?
Michelle: It is something that you cannot explain to anyone and have them even kind of understand how crazy it really is. It is absolutely insane. Every part of it is the top and intimate. It's like, this whole experience, you're opening up your heart and your soul, and you're so vulnerable. It's one of those things where, if you've done it before, and you meet someone that’s been on it, you just connect.

Wetpaint: What did you learn about dating from that very public experience?
Michelle: Oh, my gosh, this is my best, best friend of all of America. [interruption] I don't know how much I really took away from that that applied to relationships. I took a lot of things away that really helped me personally, a lot of the kind of ridicule that I received from the show. It's so easy to point fingers and blame, and at the end of the day, you sign up for a reality show, you take that risk. You sign your life away, and you open yourself up to that kind of exposure and criticism and editing, and you really can't blame anyone. The editors are just doing their job. The producers are just doing their job. You never think it's going to be you that it happens to. So when it does happen, I think it was one of those experiences that made me stronger and just helps you take personal accountability. It helped me realize who my true friends were. I know who I am. I know who my girls are. My family is so supportive. It's one of those things, as hard as it was, I would never take it back. I wouldn't go back and change one thing because I grew so much from it.

Reporting by Carita Rizzo