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Our beloved Gia Allemand is a cover girl this week, for the saddest of reasons. Us Weekly featured Gia with the headline "Bachelor Suicide" front and center this week. The story they’re leading with? "Desperate to marry and be a mom, Gia couldn't cope with another breakup. Inside her tragic death." And while we aren’t so quick to sum up her tragic loss with such a simple reason, we were curious to know what “exclusive” information they had attained for their story.

Gia, who was 29 years old at the time of her death on August 14, competed for love on Jake Pavelka's The Bachelor Season 14, but found it in real life with basketball boyfriend Ryan Anderson. They had been dating for two-and-a-half years, and she moved from New York to New Orleans to be with him. At the time she moved, we wondered if we should put her on Ring Watch, since they were serious and seemed headed toward an engagement.

However, in the new Us Weekly, an unnamed source said there was trouble in the relationship. Gia and Ryan were reportedly "fighting a lot" over their different ideas of the future. She reportedly wanted to get married and have kids, but the insider said Ryan, 25, “wasn’t ready to commit” and “started breakup talks.”

The phrasing makes it sound like Us may have talked to one of Ryan's friends, but it's not clear who their source was, and on what side of the relationship he or she was coming from. Further, we are keeping in mind that Gia's mom said last week that Gia's family and close friends had not spoken to the media, apart from official statements, and she refuted all statements made by so-called insiders.

It’s also sticky ground to insinuate anything about Ryan, who called Gia "the most beautiful person I knew inside and out" in a statement released after her passing. We have no idea what was going on in their private lives, and even if they weren't on the same page in terms of a future, there's no knowing whether her relationship had anything to do with her decision to take her own life. It's understandable to want to know what happened — what led someone so beloved to leave us behind? — but we may have to accept that some tragedies are just beyond comprehension.

Source: Us Weekly