7 Reasons You Need More \'The Bold Type\' in Your Life

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7 Reasons You Need More ‘The Bold Type’ in Your Life

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7 Reasons You Need More \'The Bold Type\' in Your Life

The Bold Type wrapped its summer season this week, and the fact we don't yet know if the show will be returning fills us with a kind of dread. The kind you feel when you meet your soulmate only to find out they just got a job offer across the country.

Because over the past 10 weeks, the new Freeform show has worked its way into our hearts in a way no other show targeted at millennials has since... well, maybe ever.

Here are 7 reasons why we — and you — need The Bold Type to return.

The Bold Type returns to Freeform — we hope! — in 2018.

7 Reasons You Need More \'The Bold Type\' in Your Life
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Positive female friendship is the cornerstone

Positive female friendship is the cornerstone

We love romance, drama, and great fashion, but the element of this show that keeps us invested is the friendship between Kat, Jane, and Sutton. 

The magazine industry has way too often shown women engaged in back stabbing and petty infighting. Perhaps it's because the trio work in non-competing departments, but it's so refreshing to see work relationships as we experience them. 

We've made some of our best friends at work. These are the people we invite to our weddings, whose successes we celebrate long after our professional relationships with each other end. We're glad to finally see that depicted on-screen.

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Positive female friendship is the cornerstone

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We love romance, drama, and great fashion, but the element of this show that keeps us invested is the friendship between Kat, Jane, and Sutton. 

The magazine industry has way too often shown women engaged in back stabbing and petty infighting. Perhaps it's because the trio work in non-competing departments, but it's so refreshing to see work relationships as we experience them. 

We've made some of our best friends at work. These are the people we invite to our weddings, whose successes we celebrate long after our professional relationships with each other end. We're glad to finally see that depicted on-screen.

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Every episode passes the Bechdel Test

Every episode passes the Bechdel Test

It's unfortunately rare for any film or show to consistently feature more than two women (with names) having a conversation about something other than a man — AKA the three requirements to pass the Bechdel Test.

Sure, there's plenty of talking about boys and sex, but these girls talk about everything from fashion to social issues and current events.


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Every episode passes the Bechdel Test

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It's unfortunately rare for any film or show to consistently feature more than two women (with names) having a conversation about something other than a man — AKA the three requirements to pass the Bechdel Test.

Sure, there's plenty of talking about boys and sex, but these girls talk about everything from fashion to social issues and current events.


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Jacqueline is the kind of boss you want to grow up to be

Jacqueline is the kind of boss you want to grow up to be

Though we couldn't help but draw comparisons, Scarlet editor-in-chief Jacqueline Carlyle is no Miranda Priestly, and that's a good thing.

As fun as the Devil Wears Prada villain may be, we much prefer a boss you can fear and love, and Melora Hardin's character is definitely that.

Based on Hearst's Chief Content Officer Joanna Coles, Jacqueline is much the way the former Cosmo EIC's employees described her to show creator Sarah Watson.

"She doesn't micromanage at all, she's not mean, she's incredibly nurturing, but it makes her people work so much harder because they really want to live up to the expectations that she has for them," Sarah tells E! of the powerful mentor figure.

Jacqueline is the kind of boss you want to grow up to be

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Though we couldn't help but draw comparisons, Scarlet editor-in-chief Jacqueline Carlyle is no Miranda Priestly, and that's a good thing.

As fun as the Devil Wears Prada villain may be, we much prefer a boss you can fear and love, and Melora Hardin's character is definitely that.

Based on Hearst's Chief Content Officer Joanna Coles, Jacqueline is much the way the former Cosmo EIC's employees described her to show creator Sarah Watson.

"She doesn't micromanage at all, she's not mean, she's incredibly nurturing, but it makes her people work so much harder because they really want to live up to the expectations that she has for them," Sarah tells E! of the powerful mentor figure.

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It's realistic but aspirational

It's realistic but aspirational

The girls wear clothes most of us can't afford, true, but that is a very real perk to working for a high-profile fashion magazine. 

But Sutton's low salary as a fashion department assistant, the fact she and Jane share a tiny one bedroom — those are pretty real. 

It's at least more realistic than Carrie Bradshaw having that wardrobe and that apartment while writing one weekly newspaper column.

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It's realistic but aspirational

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The girls wear clothes most of us can't afford, true, but that is a very real perk to working for a high-profile fashion magazine. 

But Sutton's low salary as a fashion department assistant, the fact she and Jane share a tiny one bedroom — those are pretty real. 

It's at least more realistic than Carrie Bradshaw having that wardrobe and that apartment while writing one weekly newspaper column.

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The clothes really are great, though

The clothes really are great, though

We need to get our hands on the guide Sutton wrote  on affordable alternatives to their Fashion Week looks, because there are about 10 looks per episode we want to emulate.

The finale, which centered on NYC's busiest semiannual event in fashion, definitely brought the looks to a new plateau. 

As much as our wallets can't deal with it, we really need this kind of style inspiration in our lives.

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The clothes really are great, though

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We need to get our hands on the guide Sutton wrote  on affordable alternatives to their Fashion Week looks, because there are about 10 looks per episode we want to emulate.

The finale, which centered on NYC's busiest semiannual event in fashion, definitely brought the looks to a new plateau. 

As much as our wallets can't deal with it, we really need this kind of style inspiration in our lives.

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The love interests are really hot

The love interests are really hot

Continuing with the superficial for a moment, the pretty clothes aren't the only eye candy. 

Whether you're into a hot but fashion-challenged writer like Alex, a reformable bad boy like Pinstripe Guy, or a sexy lesbian Muslim activist-artist, you've got a potential crush on this show.

The love interests are really hot

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Continuing with the superficial for a moment, the pretty clothes aren't the only eye candy. 

Whether you're into a hot but fashion-challenged writer like Alex, a reformable bad boy like Pinstripe Guy, or a sexy lesbian Muslim activist-artist, you've got a potential crush on this show.

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It's unapologetically optimistic

It's unapologetically optimistic

Despite dealing with a lot of the very real problems millennials are facing in 2017, the show is hopeful. 

And with all that's going on in the world, hope has felt slippery in recent years, especially for young professionals beginning a career with crushing student loan debt and a great deal of sociopolitical turmoil.

It's a much-needed breath of fresh air to watch a show that isn't so apocalyptic and dark.


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It's unapologetically optimistic

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Despite dealing with a lot of the very real problems millennials are facing in 2017, the show is hopeful. 

And with all that's going on in the world, hope has felt slippery in recent years, especially for young professionals beginning a career with crushing student loan debt and a great deal of sociopolitical turmoil.

It's a much-needed breath of fresh air to watch a show that isn't so apocalyptic and dark.


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The Bold Type wrapped its summer season this week, and the fact we don't yet know if the show will be returning fills us with a kind of dread. The kind you feel when you meet your soulmate only to find out they just got a job offer across the country.

Because over the past 10 weeks, the new Freeform show has worked its way into our hearts in a way no other show targeted at millennials has since... well, maybe ever.

Here are 7 reasons why we — and you — need The Bold Type to return.

The Bold Type returns to Freeform — we hope! — in 2018.