Since Season 2 of The Voice ended in May 2012, Team Adam semi-finalist Katrina Parker has been hard at work. She’s currently working on her first post-Voice album, thanks to a Kickstarter campaign that exceeded her goal of $19,500 and brought in $24,638.

Now she’s ready for fans to hear her signature sound. She recently spoke with Wetpaint Entertainment about life after the cameras stop rolling.

Wetpaint Entertainment: How's life been since The Voice?

Katrina Parker: It's been very productive. After the show, I took a few months off to write and figure out where I wanted to go musically. A lot of people came into the show with a really clear musical aesthetic and idea of who they were as an artist. I took two years off before the show, and I was a little bit of a blank slate in some ways. So I took a few months, and I just wrote and co‑wrote.

Who did you end up figuring out you were as an artist?

I call [the music on my album] indie-pop for grown‑ups. And I don't mean it's just for grown‑ups. I think it's all ages, but I do think I have a very specific voice. And I think it's that I'm a grown woman, and I've been through a lot. And I think that’s reflected in the music, kind of the good, the bad, and the ugly.

So like, Adele type stuff? Romantic and heartbreaking?

It's a combination of things. The single is really fun. It's a little unexpected. It's this really driving kind of “you done me wrong” song. It's a little P!nk, a little Kelly Clarkson, and a little bit of Goldfrapp Supernature. And that's the part of me I didn't really show on The Voice. I feel like I did a lot of really big ballads and things like that. I mean, I did “Killing Me Softly” which is a little more funk, but beyond the song I did, “Perfect," I don't think you heard that part of me. So that's the single. I think if I had to pick someone, it would be more P!nk or Kelly Clarkson. I feel like there's already an Adele. She's hugely popular, but that's not where my heart is. There’s a couple of songs that are a little more like Florence + the Machine. I have a love for that type of music. So I had to have a couple of things on there in that vein.

So, you come off the show where someone's held your hand through the process for a certain number of months. As soon as it’s over, are you on your own? Is it like, “Goodbye, good luck?”

Honestly, unless you get a record deal, I feel like it's kind of like being ejected from the warm womb. They're very kind, and everyone gives you their contact information. But once you're off the show, it's hard to figure out what you want to do next. No one shows at your door. There’s no reality star unicorn that shows up with vats of money and a record deal. Lucky for me, I have some really great friends who are in the industry who have given me beautiful advice and connected me to some great people, producers and other writers. And I'm very lucky. I can't imagine being somebody maybe from the Midwest who comes out here to do the show and it’s over, and they're like, “OK. I've got it made. I'm going to do this,” and they have no contacts outside of the show. It's got to be really difficult because you really are kind of adrift. You do a demo. You try to make the records. You do the Kickstarters.

Did you find that there was an advantage to having those months of sort of exposure?

Oh, absolutely. I mean anyone who doesn't consider that an advantage is someone who maybe just doesn't want an audience. We all do music to be heard. I'm so lucky I got to be on so long. I can't imagine being on for one or two episodes because you put so much work into it. Having fans now that are excited about you, and are saying to you, “I want to hear your original music,” it's beautiful.

What's the reality of the mentorship after the show? I assume you have Adam Levine's contact information, but as far as how much you're in touch, what happens?

We honestly weren't really in touch a lot after the show. I know every contestant and every coach is different, but what happens is they get busy, and you get busy. It is very hard to stay in touch. I did get very lucky though in that I went to the Maroon 5 Grammy party on Grammy night. It was the first time I saw Adam since the show, and it was really beautiful. It was like I had just seen him. And he was as gracious as ever and as encouraging as ever, and told me to keep doing it. I don't expect that the coaches are going to stay in touch with all of the semifinalists or all of their top 12. I mean, they're busy, and they do so much. You just have to hope that you see them at a party.

What did you learn from Adam?

Adam is so focused and so driven. I think that he showed me that I can be a lot stronger than I ever thought I was. He threw a lot of challenges my way that were really hard for me. He also was very open to having his mind changed about me from the very beginning, and that opened my eyes. It was like, if I can surprise him, I can surprise myself. That became my goal in the competition, to step out of my comfort zone and do things that are scary and do things I'm going to be afraid of because if I’m afraid of what might or might not be, it’s what I’m supposed to be doing. It's just going to make you grow, and I think Adam's a big example of someone who does everything. I mean, he does acting. He did the show, which at the time was a very scary thing. And look how it turned out for him. He's very focused and driven and determined to get success. I think that kind of rubbed off on me a little bit.

Katrina Parker will be performing at The Hotel Café in Los Angeles on March 16, 2013. To keep up with her online, check out her Twitter @katrinapmusic and her website www.katrinaparker.com.