You have to be a bit in awe of Julie Plec. Come fall, she’ll have three shows on The CW: The Originals, The Vampire Diaries, and The Tomorrow People. At CBS’s Summer TCA All-Star event, Wetpaint Entertainment had to ask how she’s handling the workload and what TVD fans can expect from the spin-off.

Wetpaint Entertainment: How exhausted are you?

Julie Plec: I'm great.

How are you doing this?

JP: Here's the thing. Here's the best part. So on Vampire Diaries, [executive producer] Caroline [Dries]'s been with the show since the end of Season 1. [Writer] Brian [Young]'s been with the show since day one, and Brian and I actually go all the way back to Kyle XY. So the two of them know my own head and my own brain better than I do and have managed to not only participate and survive the four seasons, but become better than me at what I do on that show. So it's good to see them sort of fly a little bit and keep the show brilliant. The Originals, I have [Michael] Narducci, who was one of the team favorites of The Vampire Diaries up until this year, who's thankfully right there with me and helping me with everything. And on The Tomorrow People, Greg [Berlanti] has a machine. He's got Phil Klemmer. He's got Jeff Rake. He's got Nick Wootton, supervising. I mean, he's got an A-list who's who of amazing writers working on that show, and so I'll call up kind of sheepishly and be like, “Hey guys. I have an idea.” And they'll be like patting me on the head, like, “Oh, that's so sweet, Julie. Thank you so much. Good to talk to you. Call us next week.” And then I put my tail between my legs and I slink back to my other two shows.

As far as The Originals, is the tonal difference something you love? Are there stories that you never could tell on Vampire Diaries?

JP: You know, I mean, the one great thing about The Vampire Diaries is we never had any limits, and we never had any boundaries. Our rules were self-prescribed. We didn't want to jump the shark. We didn't want to get too out there, and every now and then we'd break our own rules out of either desperation or necessity. The Originals is the same way. It's just a more grown-up version of the same kind of world. It's not about coming of age and struggling with first loves and teenage problems and young brotherhood. It's a thousand-year family dynasty returning to a home that, for centuries they were happy and then lost. And so it's about power and ambition and loyalty. It's got much stronger flavors of mafia and Shakespeare and deep, deep, deep emotional ties and scars and battles. So it's a little bit older, but it's still got all the great snark and the perverse fun that The Vampire Diaries has. It's in a little bit more of a designer, grown up package.

Do you think you want to get into the issues of parenting with Klaus?

JP: Oh, absolutely. Well, it's less about how to parent and more about what it was like to be badly parented. And Klaus, for sure, we've already seen in The Vampire Diaries and will be reminded of in The Originals, had pretty much the two worst parents on the planet. And Elijah as the failure of the parents of the Original parents, has become as the eldest remaining brother, someone who cares deeply about keeping his family together, and Hayley, we met on Vampire Diaries searching for answers about her birth parents who she never knew. And we're told that her adopted parents kicked her out the minute she became a werewolf. So poor home girl has never had good parenting in her life, and now here she is, saddled with a product of a one-night stand with this other guy who's more screwed up than she even is. What's fun about it is, it's not a warm Walton's family drama, but there is great, deep, and emotional family dynamics to it that I think will really draw people in. At least I hope so.



Credit: KSITE TV Photo: Candice Accola: Caroline Doesn't Expect to End Up With Klaus